Layout Image

FACTSHEETS

Paper Bags

Paper bags and sacks can be essentially divided into two categories: the lighter paper bags used to carry groceries and fast-food take-outs; and the heavier multi-wall sacks containing products like flour and cement, sugar and animal feed. Multi-wall bags are also used for the collection of leaf and yard waste and organic (food scraps) from households. Read more….

Paper packaging comes from a renewable source

Paper packaging comes from a renewable source updated

Unlike most other packaging materials, paper packaging is originally made from a renewable resource — trees. And those trees are in good shape. See Factsheet – The Truth about Trees. It may come as a surprise to many, but the commercial forest represents only 21% of Canada’s total land area (by far the greatest part is what is called “non-forest land” — primarily used for the growing of agricultural crops). Read more….

The Truth about Trees updated

First of all, trees are made from a renewable resource. What does that mean? It means they are not made from oil or natural gas or other non-renewable fossil fuels. Like other paper-based materials, paper packaging originally comes from growing trees. Read more….

What’s the biggest user of the commercial forest? updated

The answer may surprise you! Meet the mountain pine beetle This little guy and his friends have devastated 19 times more commercial forest than was harvested for pulp, paper or lumber in the latest data year. And the beetle has reportedly now jumped from the lodge pole pine trees of BC to the jack pine trees of Alberta. Read more…

What happens to paper materials put out for recycling?

What happens to paper materials put out for recycling updated

Most gets recycled! Into new boxes. A corrugated box could be made from a mixture of old corrugated boxes, corrugated cuttings, printing and writing paper, old cartons (boxboard) and wood chips, shavings and sawdust left over from logging and sawmilling operations. Average recycled content in 2012 was 81%. Read more….

 

What can you say about recycled content in Canada updated

The reference document for this information is Environmental claims: A guide for industry and advertisers, developed by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) in partnership with the Competition Bureau Canada. Read more….

Forest Certification Standards

The Canadian Council of Forest Ministers supports third-party forest certification as a tool to demonstrate the rigor of Canada’s forest management laws, and to document the country’s world-class sustainable forest management record.
Read more…

Just over 10% of Canadian boxes, bags and cartons are actually made from freshly-cut trees

And you thought every time we needed another box or carton we’d just grab a chainsaw and head for the forest! No. Only 11% of all paper-based packaging made by Canadian mills for the domestic market actually uses freshly-cut trees. The balance comes from recycled paper and board and what are called wood residues (wood chips, shavings and sawdust left over from logging operations). Read more…

Most paper packaging is recyclable and/or compostable

Most paper packaging is recyclable and/or compostable

Most paper packaging is recyclable. The few exceptions are generally where wax or non-paper materials have been added to the paper so that the container can perform its particular packaging function ─ delivering a product in optimum condition to the consumer. Read more…

Most materials are technically recyclable

Recyclable

What “recyclable” means: Most materials are technically recyclable. Whether they are actually sent for recycling or recycled into something else is sometimes an entirely different story (see Recycling Rates factsheet). In Canada, use of the term “Recyclable” on a package is governed by the environmental labeling guidelines developed by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and the Competition Bureau, an independent law enforcement agency of the Government of Canada that protects and promotes competitive markets and enables informed consumer choice. Section 10.7 of these guidelines for industry and advertisers covers what and how claims for recyclability can be made. Read more…

The Paper Recycling Flow Chart

The Paper Recycling Flow Chart

Primary or (virgin) paper fibres harvested from logs is long and strong. It is prized for these qualities where strength factors are paramount.

The blending of virgin fibre with used paper is also necessary to keep the whole paper recycling loop going since the fibres become shorter and weaker the more times they are recycled. Read more…

Recycling Rates

Recycling Rates

Clarification of Terms: By “Recycling Rate” we mean the amount of material “sent for recycling” compared to the amount that was originally generated or consumed in the marketplace. It is what has been collected for recycling minus any residue (contamination) removed at the initial processing stage (at a material recovery facility or MRF, for example). Read more…

Landfills get fat, not heavy

Landfills get fat, not heavy

Measurement by weight is commonly used to describe how much material enters a landfill or makes up a household’s waste stream. But when you think about it, it is not so much the weight of a material that fills up a landfill or a recycling truck as the volume of that material or the space it takes up. As they say, landfills get fat, not heavy!. Read more…

Waste Diversion Statistics

Waste Diversion Statistics

Waste diversion statistics would have to be the most sought-after, contested, and misrepresented numbers around. How does one make sense of it all? The first point to note is that waste diversion is usually expressed in terms of weight (tonnes). While weight is certainly a useful measuring stick for disposal and recycling, it does not actually measure environmental performance. Read more…

Making do with less

Making do with less

At first sight it may seem strange that the paper packaging industry would actively promote the use of less packaging. But in fact paper packaging converters have always operated on the basis of reducing their production costs and persuading their various clients that their particular option will save the client more money. Read more…

The composting alternative

 The composting alternative

While most paper products are recyclable, sometimes they are just too far away from a recycling mill for recycling to be economically worthwhile. For example, there are limited or no suitable recycling facilities in the Atlantic or Prairie Provinces for the recycling of some used paper packaging. Even rural communities in provinces where there are recycling mills are concerned about the costs of shipping generally low-value used paper long distances for minimal economic benefit. Read more…

The waxed corrugated challenge

The waxed corrugated challenge

Waxes are applied in fish, poultry, meat and some vegetable packaging so that ice and water can be packed against the product, keeping it fresh.
The wax may appear as a coating on the inside and/or the outside layer of the box. On others, the wax is impregnated into the ruffled fluted layer of the box, making it less visible. Read more…
Read the entire report here…